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How Mountain Ice Sports Recovery Gel Can Reduce Pain from the Most Common Orthopedic Hockey Injuries

Hockey is a great way to stay in shape during the winter and maintain good cardiovascular health while sharing the love of a sport with other people, but dedicated players know the risks of injuries. Hockey players put enormous stress on their bodies through repetitive stress, long practice hours, and limited recovery periods. Read on below to learn the most common types of orthopedic hockey injuries and how Mountain Ice Sports Recovery Gel can improve your training experience and recovery time!

 Mountain Ice Sports Recovery Gel for Hockey Injury Muscle Recovery

1. Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint Injury

Accounting for more than 40 percent of all shoulder injuries, this involves a separation or other injury in the acromioclavicular joint of the shoulder. This joint connects the collarbone, or clavicle, to the scapula, the large bone behind the shoulder known as the shoulder blade. An AC injury may involve stretching or tearing the ligaments of this joint, possibly leading to a separation or dislocated shoulder where the collarbone becomes untethered from the shoulder blade. Symptoms include:

  • Joint immobility: inability to move the shoulder.
  • Intense pain.
  • Swelling or bruising.
  • Muscle spasms
  • Visible deformation, including your shoulder looking out of place.
  • Numbness, weakness, or tingling: at the site of the injury or nearby, in places like the neck or lower arm.

It takes considerable force to dislocate a shoulder, but it's the most frequent dislocation to happen. It's a common injury in contact sports like hockey. Causes include:

  • Extreme rotation.
  • Strong force applied to the shoulder, such as a sudden blow. This is most common when being checked into the boards.

2. Dislocated Shoulder

An injury that involves your upper arm bone popping out of your shoulder socket, which can happen completely or partially. This may also involve stretching or tearing the connective tissue that reinforces your shoulder joint. Symptoms include:

  • Joint immobility: inability to move the shoulder.
  • Intense pain.
  • Swelling or bruising.
  • Muscle spasms
  • Visible deformation, including your shoulder looking out of place.
  • Numbness, weakness, or tingling: at the site of the injury or nearby, in places like the neck or lower arm.

It takes considerable force to dislocate a shoulder, but it's the most frequent dislocation to happen. It's a common injury in contact sports like hockey. Causes include:

  • Extreme rotation.
  • Strong force applied to the shoulder, such as a sudden blow. This is most common when being checked into the boards.

3. ACL Injury

Sprain or tear of the ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament), a ligament that connects the femur to the tibia through the center of the knee. An ACL injury will likely require an MRI to properly diagnose. Symptoms may vary in intensity but can include:

  • A loud popping sound or sensation in the knee.
  • Pain: ranging from sore to severe.
  • Swelling.
  • Reduced range of motion.
  • Trouble walking or putting pressure on injured leg.
  • Feeling of instability, or "giving way" when pressure is put on leg.

The skating in hockey puts considerable pressure on the knee, especially during sudden directional changes or stops. The ACL is a stabilizing ligament, but if a twisting or stretching force is too much for the ACL, it can rupture. Causes include: Causes include:

  • Sudden directional changes.
  • Sudden stops.
  • Twisting motion with a planted foot.
  • Catching a skate edge and twisting your knee.
  • Direct blows to the knee.

4. MCL Injury

Sprain or tear of the MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament), a ligament that connects the femur to the tibia along the inside of the knee. An MCL injury will likely require an MRI to properly diagnose. Symptoms may vary in intensity but can include:

  • A loud popping sound or sensation in the knee.
  • Pain: ranging from sore to severe.
  • Swelling.
  • Reduced range of motion.
  • Trouble walking or putting pressure on injured leg.
  • Feeling of instability, or "giving way" when pressure is put on leg.

The skating in hockey puts considerable pressure on the knee, especially during sudden directional changes or stops. The MCL is a stabilizing ligament, but if a twisting or stretching force is too much for the MCL, it can rupture. Causes include:

  • Sudden directional changes.
  • Sudden stops.
  • Twisting motion with a planted foot.
  • Catching a skate edge and twisting your knee.
  • Direct blows to the knee.

5. Elbow Injuries

The tip of the elbow is a prominent, bony point known as the olecranon, and this area is prone to damage during hockey, whether through collision with other players, getting checked into the boards, or falls on the ice. This can result in dislocation.

 

Overuse injuries are also common in hockey, especially to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), also known as the Tommy John ligament. This ligament complex (in this case, three thick bands of tissue that hold bones together) runs on the inside of the elbow and connects the humerus, the upper arm bone, with the ulna, one of the forearm bones. Symptoms include:

  • Inner elbow pain that worsens over time.
  • A popping feeling, followed by intense pain, after throwing.

These injuries develop over time during the repetitive swinging motion and grip-related stress of regular hockey stick use. Causes include:

  • Gradual tendon damage: small tears in the UCL increase with time and use, breaking down its tissue.
  • Overuse.
  • Lack of recovery time.

6. Hamstring and Groin Injuries

The most common sports injury, hamstring injuries involve pain and tearing in the muscles on the back of your thigh. These muscles are responsible for hip and knee movements in walking, squatting, bending your knees, and tilting your pelvis, as well as decelerating your lower leg during the "swing phase" (when your foot is off the ground) of the running cycle. Symptoms include:

  • Straining, tightness, and weakness in your hamstring that develops gradually, which can lead to a sudden tear.
  • Tenderness to the touch.
  • Bruising.

The thigh, hips, and groin endure a great deal of pressure during hockey, largely due to the frequent hip extension, flexing, and turning that happen during skating. Causes include:

  • Muscle overload: strains and tears as the muscle lengthens and contracts during use. Often happens with extreme or sudden motions, especially after long-term wear and tear has set in.
  • Muscle imbalances.
  • Muscle fatigue.
  • Poor conditioning.
  • Exercising with tight muscles.

Long-term damage to the groin can also cause chronic pain and dilation of the superficial ring of the inguinal canal, the passages in the abdominal wall that house male spermatic cords and the round ligament of the uterus in females. This is condition known as athletic pubalgia, or hockey groin syndrome.

7. Ankle Sprain

A sprained ankle occurs when you twist, turn, or otherwise move your ankle in an awkward way, stretching or tearing the ligaments, the connective tissue that helps connect your ankle bones. Symptoms include:

  • Pain and swelling in the ankle.
  • Ankle bruising and discoloration.
  • Limited range of motion.

Ankle sprains are a common sports injury. Although overuse can increase their risk, they're typically the result of a sudden accident. Causes include:

  • A stretched or torn ligament due to the ankle being moved out of normal position.

 Mountain Ice Sports Recovery Gel for Hockey Injury Muscle Recovery

How Can Mountain Ice Sports Recovery Gel Help Reduce Pain from Hockey Injuries?

Injuries are extremely common for athletes and tend to develop gradually due to repetitive stress on the legs combined with poor or limited downtime after exercise. Mountain Ice Sports Recovery Gel is a unique formulation of high-quality, all-natural ingredients designed to reduce muscle, joint, tendon, and ligament soreness and strain after exercise! Our ingredients have been specially chosen to reduce inflammation and strain after physical activity:

  • Menthol: Its cooling sensation numbs pain, providing immediate relief, while it widens blood vessels to improve circulation and deliver more oxygen and nutrients to damaged areas.
  • MSM: Prevents breakdown of connective tissue like ligaments and reduces inflammation.
  • Spearmint: Soothes pain and muscle contractions, reducing stress on the foot.
  • Aloe Vera: Anti-inflammatory plant that promotes faster muscle recovery.
  • Camphor: Cooling pain reliever that reduces swelling from injury and increases circulation.
  • Vitamin E: Reduces muscle soreness and encourages muscle rebuilding, strengthening muscle support.
  • Green Tea Extract: Powerful antioxidant that reduces the oxidative stress that can cause inflammation.
  • Arnica Flower: Relieves inflammation and muscle soreness while improving circulation.
  • Turmeric: Inhibits inflammatory response while promoting deep absorption of ingredients, fighting pain at its source.

Are you looking for pain relief from football or other sports injuries? Click here to try Mountain Ice Sports Recovery Gel today to get back on your feet!

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